Aside

Une Petite Bonjour

Oh gosh, it’s been a while since i’ve written and i can honestly say it’s been a combination of laziness, exhaustion and too many things happening, my list of things to write is piling higher and higher.

I’m just writing this post to check in with you all and apologise again for being too busy to keep you updated. I promise the next post will be fully a fully descriptive, detailed photo diary explaining all these eventful things.

Here are some small things that i’ve picked up about myself and the french culture:

* Whilst eating lunch, having anything less than an hour is considered not enough time to eat. The usual 2 hours is most definitely needed.

* Yogurt is considered a desert.

* I’ve felt myself come quite patriotic whilst i’ve been abroad. Every once and a while i get these outbursts and just want to tell everyone about all the great things about Australia. Or the other day someone said that Vegemite is               ” ridiculous” and i was about to hit them over the head.

* But then again being here makes me wish i was French too, and wishing i never had to leave.

* It’s only natural for all things in the town to close a lunchtime. Between the hours of 12-2.

* It’s only natural for all things to be closed on Sundays.

* French people have mastered walking in heals on cobblestone pathways.

* The once a day purchase of baguettes and croissants.

* The sound of certain words in French sounding similar to rude words in English.

* Dinner should always follow this order: ham/prociutto/chorizo, salad, entree, main, cheese, dessert

* It’s exactly like you would imagine a small village to be. Everyone knows everyone, there’s not a time you go to the town and not see someone you know whether it be a school friend, cousin, aunty,  godfathers, brothers, son. Or even your godfathers brothers son.

* I can 99% confirm french people don’t like Vegemite.

* At school in Aus we’d complain if we had a class on the second floor. But here if you have class on the 4th floor that’s 8 flights of stairs you have to do!!

I’m sorry for the short post again. I’d write more but i’m off skiing tomorrow morning and i have a super big cup of tea waiting on my desk for a Carrie Diaries marathon which is needed. I just finished playing a super intense card game with my family; the kind where blood pressure rises and concentration levels are at their highest. Goodness it was such fun. But we can now look at each other in the eye again, thankfully no friendships lost. As the tv show/film Madeline says. ” We love our bread, we love our butter, but most of all, we love each other.”

 

Love always,

Justine.

Les Vacances

Bonjour mes amis,

I’ve written drafts and drafts of this post mainly because i’m trying to find the best way to describe everything from the past few weeks without writing a whole novel about it.

I keep saying this to myself and to almost everyone i talk too but i can’t believe it’s already been two months! Time’s been travelling so quickly, mainly because i’m always finding myself busy. The holidays were so much fun and i’m so fortunate to have visited the places i did.

For sure in the holidays when halloween came i didn’t really expect a small town in France to celebrate it; nor the even smaller town we stayed in Spain during Halloween. Although i was proven wrong when my host mum came down with a huge box of things we were setting up around the house and people trick-or-treating in Spain.

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So during the first week my host mum and younger sister Maeli packed up our bags and set off for Toulouse to escape the beginning of the cold weather and head somewhere a little warmer! It was an hour and a half drive through the Midi Pyranees until we arrived.  We stayed with my host mums sister, husband and her adorable children. Whilst there i visited the huge town of Toulouse- doing a lot of shopping and probably  went in as many boutiques as one person can possibly go into during one day.( It’s fair to say that most of my savings has gone- probably not a wise move. You can’t put a price on memories though. Right?) Nathalie ( my host mum’s) brother in law took his kids, my host sister and i on a tour of Toulouse. Toulouse is mainly known as the Ville Rose or pink city because all of the original buildings were carved all by red/pink coloured bricks. We got to see everything Toulouse has to offer in the comfort of a chair on a mini road train. One of the main things i loved about Toulouse was the atmosphere. The town was so busy but everyone was so relaxed whether it was just shopping or drinking coffee from one of the cafes. Toulouse is a huge town compared to the one i’m living in most of the people in Toulouse are students ( 100,000 of them!) We spent the whole day exploring the town and grabbing a bite to eat from a boulangerie.

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My gorgeous little cousin Emy
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The next day we sent off travelling further south to the medieval fortified city Carcassonne. Carcassone is now Europe’s largest fortified city!  The town is perched on the hilltops above the River Aude. First settlement dates back to 3500 BC. The  old city was  going to be demolished but luckily the people of Carcossonne ensured it was saved. Interestingly, the architect hired in 1853 to start the restoration work, Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, was the same person who completed the works on Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

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The legend of Carcassonne i found absolutely fascinating! I’ve become so intrigued  by anything that is connected to the history of any of the towns i’ve visited. The legends are my favourite because their stories that have been pasted down through generations and generations and are your choice to believe!

In the eighth century, Pepin took over most of the south of France, although was unable to penetrate the fortress of Carcassonne. Because of this he situated his army around the walls of the castle with the intention of eventually starving out the inhabitants. The plan was working and the people were suffering from starvation.  However, legend says that Dame Carcas, the widow of one of the castle’s nobles thought to give all the remaining grain and feed it to one pig.  The fattened pig was then killed and catapulted over the walls to the offending army. When Pepin saw what the people had done despite waiting all that time,  the villagers were still able to feed large portions of grain to their livestock, he and his army withdrew .  The people of Carcassonne were so thankful for Dame Carcas, that bells across the castle rang in her honour. Many historians believe this legend is the source of the name Carcassonne, derived from “Carcas sonne” (‘Dame Carcas rings’).

Read more here about Carcassonne:

http://www.francemagazine.com/carcassonne-dive-into-history/

Our last stop before returning home was a picturesque town called Montauban. Image

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We browsed around the boutiques enjoying the last bit of sun for the day and then drove home in the dark.

A few days later after arriving home from Toulouse we took off on another road trip…To Spain! Yes we just casually drove and found ourselves in another country. God, i still can’t seem to wrap my head around the idea of just driving and being in another country. We arrived in Spain after an 8 hour drive and lots of caffeine. We stopped on the way at a small Spanish take away shop and grabbed the best pork and cheese sandwich ever. ( not that i’ve had another, but i’m confident it was the best) I remember how shocked i was going in with my family because my Spanish skills went as far as Dora The Explorer ever taught; and even as a child i wasn’t much of a fan. My Spanish vocabulary consisted of what i’ve been taught learning Spanish in a French school, which isn’t much. (hola, gracias, muy bien, chikas and adios.) So for the whole 4 days i just clung to my mums hand and when someone asked me a question nodded and smiled.

The beautiful Spanish town Aranda de Duero and the magnificent church it held. ImageImage

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We did some shopping in the local grocery store. It’s so amusing seeing the different produce and products offered in the grocery stores of each country.

This was the sausage isle in Spain. Image

Around the village we were living in.

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We also drove into Madrid to do what the family said was one of the biggest shopping days of the year. What a shopping day it was. When they told me that things were better quality/price wise i wasn’t sure to believe them as i knew the standard of things is pretty high in France. But i can say know that their words are definitely correct. Or well i thought so when i was shopping. We spent 8 hours in Plaza Norte Madrid taking one break for lunch.

My host sisters and i decided to take a before photo of us shopping. Unfortunately we didn’t take an after one due to all the bags we had and multiple trips to the car!

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Inside Plaza Norte

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Through family friends we got to go through and try all these sweets in a Spanish patisserie.

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I’m so thankful for being here and for seeing everything i have. It was lovely to get to have a taste of another amazing culture. It still doesn’t seem real now that in Spain we were having siestas ( not that i was actually sleeping- excitement can torture you in a weird way) and here in France i’m at school for extremely long days. I’m feeling at school they should definitely adopt the idea of siestas.    It was so great to be able to visit another European culture and live just as they do.  The food in Spain was especially amazing; the chorizo’s to die for.

So i’ll end off with saying that yes , the holidays are well and truly over now. They flew by so fast that i barely had time to mutter the word devoir (homework). So as per usual i left my homework to the last few days and had to stop my blissful state of mind from thinking of all the other wonderful things i could be doing and plant myself at my desk. Lucky for me it’s not getting marked.

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Cariños

Justine 🙂 🙂

The middle: Weeks 4, 5 and 6

I’m sorry for the late update. It’s partly due to me writing a draft and then my computer shutting down and not being able to retrieve the post. Since then i’ve been giving my computer the silent treatment. Anyway, it’s fair to say i’ve calmed down now probably because of the fact that i’m on holidays now!! That’s right after only 6 weeks of school we get 2 weeks off! I cannot wait, in a little more than a week we are off to Spain. Yes just the casual trip to another country!

It’s so lovely at the moment autumn is here and all the leaves are changing colour from bright green to a burnt orange. People at school have swaped their flats and cardigans for blazers and boots. During the last week of school the weathers been quite cold but today it brightened up and brought us Correzian’s the last of the warm weather.

It was my host sisters 17th birthday 2 weeks ago. The family came over and we celebrated with the most amazing food. Everybody was really kind and it was great meeting some of my host grandfathers Spanish brothers. ( he has 9) I played a lot with the little children who are adorable. I didn’t think the sound of the french language could get any better until i heard little children speak it. It’s the cutest thing!

Last week on Tuesday night we went driving into the country about 30 minutes away went to search for these animals called le brame du cerf ( like big bulls) we didn’t find them but we stopped the car on the side of the road with a whole lot of other people and just listened to the noise they made. It was quite an angry sound and so so loud that at times it felt they were only metres away and were about to charge after us!

The following week we caught up with Auriane’s friends and went to play lazer tag. So much fun! They then came back and we had dinner, ( which i made) Shepherds pie.

Great things that have happened this week:

This of course…

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  1. I bought Vogue Paris
  2. I has an interesting conversation with a guy i met that went to Oxford Uni and knew someone who became a secret spy for the Queen.
  3. I watched Petit Siel ( thelittle mermaid)
  4. I laughed so hard i cried. We were at the schools restaurant for lunch and this girl has said something in English that everyone knew was wrong and laughed. Then this other girl and i couldn’t stop laughing, by this point we were no longer laughing at the joke but at each other. We were absolutely hysterical and nothing anyone could do was going to calm us down. I tried to reminisce the story to my class mates but i couldn’t even get the joke out because i was laughing so much !!
  5. I got introduced to a secret code language
  6. I made a Shepherds pie. (yes mum something actually turned out on the plate)
  7. I went to the hairdressers and got the best cut and treatment ever.
  8. I met Aussies in the supermarket! In the tiny town of Terrasson and the miniature supermarket,  i overhear these people speaking English. What a small world! They were leaving and were off to the Loire valley i recommended some things which are a must in this area.
  9. Watched my first handball game
  10. The name Justine is really popular over here!  So in souvenir shops you have like justine mugs, key rings, bracelets, pencil cases, teeshirts  ect. I wont lie but i could probably construct a whole outfit by this point with my name on it

Back at home in Melbourne i’d have to say that we do coffee to an excellent standard. You can probably walk in the city and every 50 m be greeted by a cafe. Here i’m still in search of a cafe to make my regular stop.   So i’ve resorted to other options such having as much coffe flavoured things as possible such as  eclairs and profiteroles.Image

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Yesterday i went with my host  grandparents and visited Chateau de Castelnaud. It was so beautiful, very different to Chateau Hauteford because it, my host mother explained, was from the medieval times. The Chateau is a highly fortified with slits in the walls and a lake surrounding it. It was built in the 12th century and below lies this miniature village which cascades all the way to the bottom of the hill. You’ll find people showing you how fighting tools were made and also the sweetest kids costume shop you’ll ever see!  As you take the tour around the Chateau their are a number of reconstructed war machines.

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The lovely town overlooked from the top of the chateau.

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After that we drove along to the stunning town La Roque- Gageac and sat down sipped cola and just took in the spectacular view.

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Les Jardins de Collette

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The other weekend we visited Les Jardins de Collette which is these 6 beautiful gardens inspired by the regions the beloved writer Sidonie Gabrielle Colette lived in. We explored our way through the beautiful gardens and the huge maze shaped as a butterfly and it led us to a pretty valley surrounded by woodlands.

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A quote by  Collette, ” On this narrow planet, we have only the choice between two unknown worlds. One of them temps us- ah!! what a dream, to live in that!- the other stifles us at the first breadth.”ImageImage

My host sister Maeli and i.

 

 

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Everyday i’m learning something new about the place, people, food and in all the extensive culture France holds. I’m so lucky to be living in such a beautiful place with the most amazing people. I can’t even begin to explain all the amazing memories i’ve made whether it be me spraying myself with pillow perfume ( which actually smells just as good as normal perfume) or how ridiculous i look at school compared to the other students who are dressed impeccably. Every time i even whisper ‘oui’or ‘pardon’ people know straight away i’m not a native french speaker.  But i’m gripping the french lifestyle and language more day by day.

Thanks for reading 🙂

A bientôt,

Justine xxx

Aside

The Beginning : Week 3

What a day, weekend and a week it’s been! Right now i’m wrapped around blankets in bed with coffee and chocolate looking out my window/door and listening to the sound of the rain. Finally some rain after these hot days! I think the most tiring thing about coming here has been the overworking of senses. Being thrown into another environment i think you have to not only adjust to the place but the different sounds, smells and lifestyle in itself of course. Differences i’ve found is i think when you live in the city i think you definitely miss certain facets of country life.  For example this morning i literally woke up to a rooster crowing “cook a doodle doo” It’s bizarre to think now that back at home i thought that was only a cliche which existed in children’s books.

This week has definitely been great. It’s been 30 degrees plus and i’ve been arriving home from school and throwing myself into my family’s swimming pool. It’s been lovely eating dinner outside whilst watching the sunset. I’ve had my first french crepe whilst staying here, and let me tell you it definitely didn’t disappoint. Thinking back a lot of the memorable moments have been me emotionally attaching myself to what i’m eating! At school i’ve made the most lovely group of friends. Even though there is a language barrier it’s a give and take situation-  me trying my best to speak French and them trying to speak English. I had my second contemporary dance class. The dance school is hidden in a narrow street and the class in this beautiful room with wooden floors and old paintings. The dance teacher is the sweetest petite lady i just smile whenever i see her!

I know i vowed to myself that i wouldn’t make this blog just a place to store everything i do every time i do things but i cannot help myself… This weekend has just been too great! So… On Sat morning  it was drizzling so my host father and i decided against a run,  we drove into the town of Brive to fix my phone, i broke,  ( grrrrr) and to go to the weekly market that is held. I was so surprised to see how big the market was! It was full of people of all ages children running around, couples and older people. The market is very well known for it’s fresh and local produce.  There was endless amounts of fruit, veg, cheese, bread, nuts, meat, seafood, cooked foods ( such as paella) flowers, pataes and many other things.We bought just enough to eat and enjoy over lunch and flowers to last over the weekend. A funny event occured when we were driving out of town and were in a little rush ( i say a little because rushing is unusual here- unlike in Aus) and the car in front of us just stops unexpectedly in the middle of the road, the guy jumps out shakes his friends hand and has a little conversation. Meanwhile ourselves and many other people are just casually waiting for this guy to finish what we hope is a very important conversation!! I think it’s the little things like this which makes me love living here so much!

After lunch we to the  Gouffre De Padriac. The Gouffre De Padriac is a huge cave considered one of the greatest geological curiosities of France and most famous cave in Europe. The chasm was created at an undetermined point in time when the roof collapsed into a large internal cavern. It is known it existed in the 3rd century, and was inhabited during the 15h and 16th century when Potassium nitrate was extracted from the area. Inside it continues for 19km.  I cannot merely describe how beautiful this cave was. So at  normal level you  look into this huge whole 103 metres down unable to see the bottom. Then either stairs/lift down to the bottom, walk through this entrance like thing around 250 metres and catch a little boat on the river. This river was so narrow,  inside the cave you had to be quite alert otherwise you were sure to bash your head on the rocks. The formations of the rocks are wrought by billions of drops of water. When i looked up from the boat you can just see these rocks interwinding with each other so hi up! Once you get off the boat you explore with a guide the water pools. You couldn’t take photos from inside ( as the light contains a substance that can form moss on the rock) so i got some to show you guys off the postcards i bought. ImageImageImage

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On the way back after the caves we visited the unique but very mysterious town called Rocamadour. Rocamadour is a town nestled in the face of a 150m cliff, built above the Alzou Canyon in the South- West France and it’ s the perfect place to hold such a spooky legend. Is also a town with a population of 600 but attracts more than a million visitors a year.  It is a very holy town with a chapel, a one-time monastery, and a few houses resting at it’s feet. No one is really sure why or how Rocamadour started and is like this now, but it has been a significant religious site since the early tenth century. Today the town survives on pilgrims and tourists coming to pay their respects and euros.Image

A photo of Rocamadou (

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The terracotta-hued rooftops, the flowers hanging from the windows ( a Europe trademark)  the ageless view comprise a brilliant landmark.I noticed whilst examining the place,  the other people were wandering in silence analysing every aspect of the buildings.  I  think  it was  to check that no medieval people will pop out unexpectedly from the places you aren’t allowed access too.

As i walk through the remarkable town of Rocamador and up the steps i  imagine what it would’ve been like in the 12th century as a person  walking the steps on their knees for forgiveness of their sins. When i was walking i realised i was walking through a once residential museum.

Rocamadour is the home to the sanctuary of the Black Madonna, Durandal the sword of Charlemangne perched up on the mountain and the Miracle Bell.

It is believed the bell rings whenever Our Lady saves someone whose life is threatened, especially sailors.

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So heres some back ground research i managed to find:

In 1166 a body was found in a miraculously preserved state in a burial crypt beside the chapel of the Black Virgin. People believed because the body was so well preserved it must have been a saint.  Since the 15th century the general consensus is that the body was that of Zaccheus. His wife is well known as Saint Veronica the lovely woman who wiped clean the bloody face of Jesus while he was carrying the crucifixion cross…   Husband and wife fled Palestine and settled in this region of France. Before his death while living as a hermit at Rocamadour, angels guided Zaccheus to a Pagan shrine dedicated to the earth. Mother Goddess, which he replaced with a Black Virgin sculptured by Saint Luke.

After Henry II King of England and western France (father of Richard the Lionheart) was cured of an illness, word spread of the miracles occurring at Rocamadour. Already by 1172 a 127 miracles were recorded, the multitudes were starting to pour in.

In the 12th century a collection of 126 reported miracles attributed to Our Lady of Rocamadour was compiled and many more have been recounted since. She has healed the sick and insane, punished criminals, threatened and converted those who did not respect her, won battles for her followers, brought dead babies back to life at least long enough to be baptized, freed captives, protected sailors, helped women conceive and give birth, and performed just about every other imaginable miracle.

A 12th century story:

Three pilgrims from Gosa were passing through the lonely wastelands near Saint-Guilhem, when they were led astray by thieves along remote and impassable tracks, over steep mountains and along valley floors. The robbers treated these innocent people injuriously and attempted to steal the property belonging to these poor of Christ. But the advocate of all mankind, the powerful Lady of Rocamadour, the exceptional star who lights up the world with her radiance, came to the aid of her servants as they called out to her. As was proper, she seized hold of the servants of iniquity, these workers of wickedness, and took away their sight, which is a human being’s most cherished asset. She also paralyzed their hands and rendered them immobile like statues, out of pity leaving them only with the use of their tongues so that they could ask for mercy and express heartfelt penitence. And so with suppliant cries the robbers fell at the pilgrims’ knees and asked that they placate the Lady, who is gentle but had been offended by their misdeeds, with their prayers and merits. The pilgrims were moved by the plight of the afflicted men, and their hearts were touched. They got down on the ground to pray, raised their voices to heaven, and asked the Lady of Mercy to take pity on the wretches. Then the unique Mother of Compassion, the people’s hope for the forsaken who broke the necks of the dragon, the restorer of health, restored the thieves’ senses and returned their bodies to their former health.

A combination of wars, epidemics, climate change and consequent famines considerably reduced the population and prevented people going on pilgrimages. Protestant mercenaries sacked the town during the Wars of Religion, and despite sporadic attempts to rebuild it, Rocamadour remained largely forgotten until the 19th century.

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Rocamadour is exactly what you would imagine a princess living with her prince happily ever after. That being said, this town in  France is exactly where the story of Rapunzel was inspired from.

I am so amazed of the beauty this town holds it seems surreal i was walking through the town examining the surroundings just yesterday.

Here are some other photos of my travels throughout the week 🙂Image

Mes amis 🙂

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The flea market in Terrasson

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Dress bought from the flea. Image

The pretty sunset from the dinner table. Image

The local patisserie

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Havin fun in the sun

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Eating my way through the bag of Carambas. Image

In love with the view in front of my house! Please don’t change in winter!!

Bisous,

Justine xxx

The Beginning: Weeks 1 and 2

Hello, this is my first time writing because its  the only time i’ve gotten the chance! I’ve been in France for 2 weeks now and i can say its been the most fun, eye-opening, exciting and overall the  greatest 2 weeks of my life.

I’m 15 years old and come from a small seaside town in Melbourne, Australia. Here in France i’m in the second year ( which is equivalent to year 10 in Aus) I’m taking French, English, Spanish, IT, physics, chemistry, history, geography, pe and economy.

I thought i’d create this blog because:

1. So people can follow my journey living life in France.

2. I’m on my laptop 24/7 and thought my diary should be too.

I’ll be keeping updates of my travels, experiences and memories as regularly as i can. Although it will be quite hard because during the week i have school from 8- late. It changes depending on the day ad week.  All photos have been taken by myself and if not stated otherwise.

I’m currently residing in the centre-south of France . I’m learning all about the french culture including the people, towns, food and am tackling learning a new language.

Before i begin explaining what’s happened so far i think it’s important to include  why i wanted to come!

In September 2012 my parents took my brother and i on a 6 week trip to Europe  where we visited France for a few days.  I was instantly struck by the amazing architecture, people, food, art, literature, fashion and numerous other things.  I knew i had to come back!

I have a huge desire of wunderlust and am always fascinated by the unknown. Take the road less travelled by is definitely my moto. ( … or Robert Frost’s)  I’ve never known anyone personally go on exchange only friends of friends ect except for when  my grandmother hosted two girls for a few weeks and i saw how much they enjoyed it. I’m so lucky to have parents who have taken me travelling and are alway encouraging me to try new things and step out of my comfort zone, without their support i don’t think i would’ve made it to the airport.

In late February 2013 after going to many information sessions i decided to apply for Southern Cross’ Cultural exchange scholarship. I had to write an essay based on the aspects of French history i find interesting and what i think can be gained by learning about another culture. After a month i received what i think was the best phone call ever telling me my essay was the winning one . From that point i’d been preparing linguistically and mentally for this trip of a lifetime.   I couldn’t imagine that living in another culture  i would  not only learn so much about everything around me but i’ve learnt more about myself.  Even though i’ve only been here for 2 weeks i feel like i’ve learnt more than i would’ve in a year at home.

My first awkward experience here in France would definitely have to be the bise kiss. Kids our age and younger greet and say goodbye to everyone morning, noon and night here with a kiss on both cheeks. So from pretty much the time you get to school you have to be quite prompt to allow time to bise. The first time i’d met people at school i had no idea what i was doing! I didn’t know which cheek to kiss first or how many kisses to give (changes in each region in France it can go up to 4. ) So for the first few days it was everyone (lets call it bising) bising and me awkwardly going in to kiss and then stopping and the other person leaning in and ahhh. I  later learnt (the hard way) you do 2.

Here’s a link i saw and loved  on explaining the bise a little further. It’s exactly how it is!

School here is so different but i’m enjoying it. It’s very pen to paper, which i love. The students aren’t given any netboks/ipads/laptops they must write everything down. My most difficult subject would definitely have to be French. The other day  I was given 3 sheets of paper  one sheet for each of the following writing pieces. Les Miserables, L’education sentimentale and La Fortune des Rougon. They all summarised the stories and from these i had to extract and write a two page essay on ‘the vision of people’.  The teachers are all very helpful although it’s very interesting noticing the differences in relationships between students and teachers.  It’s very different from Australia where in my class we  used to have inside jokes with our teachers and very informal discussions.  Here the students must all stand up and wait for the teacher to come in and ask them to sit.

Here are some photos  of some of  the things sharing what i’ve done over the last two weeks with some of the best people ever.

My host family and i at Chateau Hautefort

My host family and i at Chateau Hautefort

Mona Lisaaa

Mona Lisaaa

Myself under the Arc De Triumph

Myself under the Arc De Triumph

Bridge crossed whilst walking through Correze lake

Bridge crossed whilst walking through Correze lake

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The beautiful town of Tulle. Where we went to celebrate the fiesta. We walked the street in the rain whilst listening to local artists with a baguette in our hands.

The beautiful town of Tulle. Where we went to celebrate the fiesta. We walked the street in the rain whilst listening to local artists with a baguette in our hands.

Chateau Hauteford.

Chateau Hauteford.

Having fun in the gardens of the chateau.

Having fun in the gardens of the chateau.

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The town overlooked by the chateau.

The town overlooked by the chateau.

The amazing view of Terrasson. Also where we went for one of the flea markets.

The amazing view of Terrasson. Also where one of the flea markets we went to was held.

À bientôt!

Justine xxx